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Iglesia de San Zaccaria (Chiesa di San Zaccaria)
Iglesia de San Zaccaria (Chiesa di San Zaccaria)

Iglesia de San Zaccaria (Chiesa di San Zaccaria)

De lunes a sábado, de 10 a. M. Al mediodía; Domingo, 4-6 pm
Campo San Zaccaria, 4693, Venice, Italy, 30122

Informacion practica

Tenga en cuenta que la iglesia cierra durante cuatro horas durante el mediodía, entre el mediodía y las 4 pm Se puede llegar fácilmente a pie desde el centro de Venecia, ya que se encuentra cerca de la Piazza San Marco.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Suitable for solo travelers, couples, and families.
  • Tours may include guide, round trip hotel transport, but not food or drink. Check specific tours for details.
  • The entrance is a non-descript door marked “please close door behind you” and is accessible via the Campo San Zaccaria; a docent should be there to assist.
  • Admission to the church is free, while entrance to the chapels and the crypt is about US$1.
  • To fully admire Bellini’s La Sacra Conversazione altarpiece, slip some change into the box and it will become illuminated.
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Ideas de viaje

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How to Get There

Located in the Castello neighborhood of Venice, just off the waterfront to the southeast of Piazza San Marco, San Zaccaria is easily accessible by foot from central Venice. Take a water taxi to vaporetto stop San Zaccaria.

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When to Get There

San Zaccaria is open Monday - Saturday, 10am - 12pm, and Sunday, 4pm - 6pm. Late spring and early summer are the best times to visit Venice in terms of weather, though crowds may be quite intense. And the prices are high. Avoid throngs of tourists while still enjoying lovely temperatures by visiting the city early spring or early to mid autumn.

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Wildcard

The Chapels and the Crypt Of the three chapels, the Cappella di San Tarasio is especially noteworthy with stunning late Gothic masterpieces—three golden polyptychs by Antonio Vivarini—as well as frescoes by Andrea del Castagno and Francesco da Faenza—the earliest examples of Renaissance painting in all of Venice. In the crypt are the funeral bodies of Venice’s doges from the 9th century, buried between columns and under vaulted ceilings, a vision enhanced by persistent flooding that creates a reflective pool.

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